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Tri-Color Times

Filed under Opinion

Knowing your values and needs keeps you going toward the right direction

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NEGATIVE peer pressure happens when someone influenced by a person who doesn’t do good things, or when people have the feeling that if they don’t do what others do, they won’t fit in. Negative peer pressure is an issue that affects many teens today. It leads good people to do bad things.

Friends influencing you to drink, smoke, or stay out late are some of the many examples of falling into peer pressure. People telling you that it won’t do you any harm may make you decide to trust them and go for it.

Teenagers are pressured to fit in. Although many know it won’t do them any good, people still decide to go for it in order to avoid being bullied or judged.

A huge example of negative peer pressure might be if you have a huge test to study for, but your friends keep on inviting you to go out late with them. You could either stay in to study or go out with your friends. Your friends may not have been intentionally planning to do anything bad, yet, it does take time away from your studying. A good decision might be to hang out with friends for a short amount of time, then go study extra.

Having self-confidence and high self-esteem can be powerful enough to allow to you stay on the right road. Listening to what you believe is the correct thing to do, and is what you should learn towards.

Peer pressure may either come directly, indirectly, or individually.

Having peer pressure come directly is when someone tells you exactly what to do, whether it’s correct or not. For example, a friend forcing you to go to a late-night party where there will be drinking. Right away you know some of their intentions aren’t good.

Indirect peer pressure is when someone or something is slowly leading you towards the wrong path. However, you may not realize it until it’s too late or already done. Another example for indirect peer pressure is classmates telling you to sluff but rapidly you begin to sluff more than once per week.

Aside from direct and indirect peer pressure, individual pressure is also there. This might lead to the need of finding new friends. Making yourself dress or act different in order to ‘fit in’ might be considered individual peer pressure. Individual pressure may simply be you telling yourself to curl your hair every once in a while. Or it could be more extreme like making yourself do something bad, such as forcing yourself not to go to school due to laziness.

Some ways of getting away from peer pressure is by saying no. Although, saying no may not always be the easiest thing to do, explaining to peers that you don’t want to take part of something is definitely okay.

Although there are negative forms peer pressure, there is also positive peer pressure. Being influenced to do your work when needed and being told to show up to school every day on time are many examples of positive peer pressure.

Positive challenges help and motivate you to do your best in all cases. It may help you reflect on your actions, which allow yourself to become a better individual.

Making sure that you’re caught up with work and grades is another form of positive peer pressure. However, many may bring laziness into this, converting it into negative peer pressure.

Bringing out positive, direct peer pressure is mainly recommended. Helping others be respectful, honest and nice is what our school needs.

an open forum for student expression
Knowing your values and needs keeps you going toward the right direction