Grab a Hot Pocket on Frozen Foods Day

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Grab a Hot Pocket on Frozen Foods Day

Ms. Faldmo cooks with frozen foods.

Ms. Faldmo cooks with frozen foods.

Ms. Faldmo cooks with frozen foods.

Ms. Faldmo cooks with frozen foods.

Axel Gonzalez, Reporter

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NATIONAL Frozen Foods Day is celebrated on March 6. It all started in 1922 by the entrepreneur and naturalist Clarence Frank Birdseye II. He discovered that by freezing food quickly, it would create smaller ice crystals which would prevent the cell walls from bursting. This process would help preserve flavor as well as the quality of the food.

To celebrate National Frozen Foods Day, these are some steps that to try. “Step one would be to prepare the day or night before by placing fruits in the freezer. Step 2 would be to eat breakfast on that day but instead of cereal, you could eat frozen breakfast like frozen waffles. Step 3 is to eat something frozen for lunch too, like a Hot Pocket. Last step would be to eat some frozen dessert like some ice cream,” as stated on the wikihow.com website.

Frozen food can be both good and bad.

“Whole food is actually good and healthy for you, but processed frozen food is not so good for you. Frozen food can stay good and safe to eat for several months for up to a year. It can also be less nutritious depending on how long it has been frozen and the way that it was processed,” Ms. Hodgson said.

It depends on what kinds of food you are freezing as to whether it will be good or bad. It also depends on how long they have been frozen for.

“Quality goes down when food is frozen for a while. I like to buy meat in bulk, then divide it and freeze it in portions. It is not good when you freeze greens such as lettuce, celery, and cucumbers; they have a lot of water in them and turn into mush if you try and freeze them,” Ms. Merrill said.

Different foods can be frozen for longer and still stay safe to eat. “For example, some guidelines from the USDA are that soups and casseroles can last two to three months frozen. Uncooked steaks, roasts, or chops can last from four to 12 months. Cooked poultry can last up to four months, and if it is uncooked, it can last from nine to 12 months,” as stated on the acac.com website.

Freezing foods comes with a lot of benefits, including saving money and also being more efficient.

“Fruits and vegetables are really good to freeze. When you freeze them, it makes them last longer, so you don’t have to keep buying them because they go bad. This could really improve your budget and is a lot more convenient. When you buy frozen food that requires you to simply warm it up, it can also help you make your meal so much faster,” Ms. Faldmo said.

Frozen food has revolutionized the food industry. This is why we celebrate this day. Just imagine how much life would be different without the conveniences frozen foods provide. So, take time to acknowledge and appreciate the frozen foods in your life on March 6.